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The shocking stat that’s costing travel agents


And the overall economy

New research has revealed the extent to which Australians are planning and booking their next holiday during work hours – and the cost of that habit on the overall economy.

 

Presented by Finder.com.au, the data shows that two in three (64%) Aussie employees – equal to 8 million people – are actively researching their vacations on their employers’ time.

 

 

With the average worker spending nearly an hour (57 minutes) a week hunting for deals on flights and accommodation, the lost productivity is costing Aussie businesses around $280.8 million in wages every single week, or $14.6 billion annually. So imagine how much more productive we’d be if we let the travel professionals do the work for us.     

 

“It’s one thing to be jumping on that flight sale during your lunch break, but it’s quite another to be regularly planning holidays during work hours,” Finder’s travel expert, Angus Kidman said.

 

“We live in an age where we’re surrounded by distractions: emails about sales are constantly flooding our inboxes and social media. While you need to be quick to get in, there’s a time and place to be acting on them.”

 

Males were found to be guiltier than females of getting caught up in holiday planning whilst at work, with 67% of men organizing travel on the job compared to 61% of women.

 

Among the age groups, Gen X were deemed the most responsible workers, with only 57% admitting to planning holidays during office hours versus 70% of Gen Y-ers and 60% of baby boomers.

 

When it comes to states and territories, Western Australia (72%) and NSW (66%) were the guiltiest, while Tasmania was seen as the most productive (59%).   

 

“Domestic flights from Western Australia can be very expensive, so this might explain why residents spend more time looking for deals on the job,” Ms Kidman said.

 

Do you ever plan and book your own holidays when you should be working?

 


Written by: Mark Harada
Published: 25 May 2018


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